Mar
31

What Information Is Being Collected On Your Kids With Common Core

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Glenn Beck has spent a lot of time over the past few weeks exposing some of the education initiatives in states across the country that are indoctrinating kids into the radical progressive agenda. Today, Glenn discussed an issue tied into Common Core that many people aren’t aware of: data mining.

“We cover many important stories and topics on this program, but I don’t think any could be more important than what we are covering tonight: the progressive takeover of America’s schools,” Glenn said.

Glenn spent the opening minutes of the monologue reviewing the scary pieces of legislation that have allowed the government access to your information through education systems.

Glenn explained that in order for states to qualify for stimulus money, they had to agree to build such systems according to federally dictated standards. The 2009 Stimulus Bill included provisions encouraging states to develop data systems for collecting a large amount of information on public-school kids. Today, all 50 states either maintain or are capable of maintaining extensive databases on public-school students.

“Everyone, myself included, mocked the wasteful spending. It was easy. Millions of dollars on turtle tunnels, interactive dance software, ant research, etc. But it was almost too easy. What did we miss while everyone complained about the sidewalks to nowhere and studies on the effects of inequity among monkeys? Could it be Obama was rushing this not because he thought turtle tunnels would help the economy – but because it had other much more important goals he didn’t want anyone to focus on?” Glenn asked.

“1,073 pages written by Van Jones and the Apollo Alliance. It was never about ‘saving or creating’ jobs. It was radical left agenda, period,” he explained.

This was done with insufficient public dialogue or feedback from experienced educators, no research, no pilot or experimental programs — no evidence at all that a floor-length list created by unnamed people attempting to standardize what’s taught is a good idea.

It’s a bad idea. Ignore the fact that specific Common Core State Standards will open up enough cans of worms to keep subject-matter specialists arguing among themselves forever. Consider instead the merit of Standards from a general perspective:

One: Standards shouldn’t be attached to school subjects, but to the qualities of mind it’s hoped the study of school subjects promotes. Subjects are mere tools, just as scalpels, acetylene torches, and transits are tools. Surgeons, welders, surveyors — and teachers — should be held accountable for the quality of what they produce, not how they produce it.

Two: The world changes. The future is indiscernible. Clinging to a static strategy in a dynamic world may be comfortable, even comforting, but it’s a Titanic-deck-chair exercise.

Three: TheCommon Core Standards assumethat what kids need to know is covered by one or another of the traditional core subjects. In fact, the unexplored intellectual terrain lying between and beyond those familiar fields of study is vast, expands by the hour, and will go in directions no one can predict.

Four: So much orchestrated attention is being showered on the Common Core Standards, the main reason for poor student performance is being ignored—a level of childhood poverty the consequences of which no amount of schooling can effectively counter.

Five: The Common Core kills innovation. When it’s the only game in town, it’s the only game in town.

Six: The Common Core Standards are a set-up for national standardized tests, tests that can’t evaluate complex thought, can’t avoid cultural bias, can’t measure non-verbal learning, can’t predict anything of consequence (and waste boatloads of money).

Seven: The word “standards” gets an approving nod from the public (and from most educators) because it means “performance that meets a standard.” However, the word also means “like everybody else,” and standardizing minds is what the Standards try to do. Common Core Standards fans sell the first meaning; the Standards deliver the second meaning. Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get.

Eight: The Common Core Standards’ stated aim — “success in college and careers”— is at best pedestrian, at worst an affront. The young should be exploring the potentials of humanness.

I’ve more beefs, but like these eight, they have to do with the quality of education, and the pursuit of educational quality isn’t what’s driving the present education reform farce.

Future historians (if there are any) are going to shake their heads in disbelief. They’ll wonder how, in a single generation, the world’s oldest democracy dismantled its engine — free, public, locally controlled, democratic education.

Stop the Common Core

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